Pastor, Keep A Close Watch On Your Life and Illustrations

by Jared C. Wilson February 13, 2017

Sermon illustrations. They can make or break your message. Or so we're told. In the days of my youth, I did some time serving as a freelance pastoral research assistant, and I remember the high premium put on "killer illustrations." One client I worked for only wanted sermon illustrations, pages and pages of them, no exegesis, no reference excerpts. I think over the course of several months, having filed numerous research briefs full of newspaper clippings, movie ancedotes, literary references, assorted fragments of pop culture detritus, and even some original creative stories, he eventually used one illustration that came from the briefs.

We all know a good illustration when we hear one in a sermon. But I'm gonna go out on a (sturdy) limb here and suggest that sermon illustrations these days are way overrated.

Yep, I said it. I think too much emphasis is put on illustrations in how we train preachers and in too many actual sermons. You shouldn't trust your illustration to do what only God's word can. And that's where many of us often go wrong with illustrations. Here is more on that thought, and some other wrong ways preachers often use illustrations in their sermons:

1. The illustrations are too long.

If you're going to eat up valuable real estate in your sermon time, you've got to make it really count. But some sermons are too reliant on long set-ups or overly present creative themes that end up obscuring the biblical message. This is a problem, assuming what you want people to focus on most is the biblical message. Some preachers really pride themselves in being storytellers or artists, and that's great -- but quit the ministry and go be a storyteller or artist. That will glorify God too. But at least then there's no mistaking the point of the message. Some illustrations go on so long and some topic themes are so pervasive, any Bible verses that show up in the sermon really only serve to support the illustration, when by definition it's supposed to be the other way around.

2. The illustrations are too numerous.

I heard a message once that began with a 5-minute story from the preacher's childhood, segued into an ancedote from the life of Leonardo DaVinci, then transitioned into a series of quotes from ancient philosophers (where Jesus appeared alongside Socrates and Aristotle, like they're all part of the same toga mafia), and stumbled into a heavy-handed object illustration complete with big props on the stage. This guy forgot what he was there to do, which ostensibly was preach. The result of all these illustrations was distracting and, actually, counter-productive, because at some point, the law of diminishing illustration returns kicked in, and each successive illustration diminished the effectiveness of the ones before it.

When you use too many illustrations, when your sermon is so full of illustrations or the time you spend on them is greater than the time you spend proclaiming and explaining the text, they stop being illustrations and become your text. Preachers who overuse illustrations are communicating that they don't actually trust the Bible -- which is inspired by the Holy Spirit -- to be interesting, provocative, and powerful.

3. The illustrations are too clunky.

You know these when you hear them. It seems as though the preacher prepared his sermon using some kind of template, plopping something from an illustration book or website every time he saw "Insert Illustration Here." Or his pop culture references are old, but not historic old (red meat for the Reformed crowd) or vintage old (ironic winks from the hipsters) but "lame" old, "out of touch" old. Maybe the stories are sappy or cheesy or hokey. Or maybe there's no decent transition from the illustration into the body of the sermon.

I've heard some guys tell a cutesy-story or badly land a bad joke and then pause, as if waiting for audience reaction, ending the silence with a "But anyway..." That's a sure sign of someone who put a lot of trust in the illustration and no thought into how it would actually fit into the tissue of the message. Remember, if the weight of power is put on your illustrations instead of the biblical text, the clunky illustration makes a clunky sermon.

4. The illustrations are too self-referential.

Here's a good rule of thumb: when using yourself as an example, be self-deprecating. Make it confessional, not exaltational. In other words, use your personal illustrations to show us not how great you are, but what you've got wrong, how you messed up, where you're deficient. It doesn't have to be a serious example; it can be a funny one. But self-referential illustrations that talk the preacher up too often violate 2 Corinthians 4:5 -- "For what we proclaim is not ourselves . . ."

This same rule applies somewhat to the use of wives and children in illustrations. Everyone appreciates a good "the pastor is a normal guy with a normal family" type story, and most preachers know not to criticize or point out flaws in their wives and kids in sermons, but if you reference your wife and kids (even positively) too much, over time it can have the same effect as the self-congratulating illustration -- it casts a vision of your family as the church's moral exemplar, which is not good for your family or the church, and also only serves to by extension exalt yourself. Use family illustrations sparingly and when using personal illustrations, go the route of self-deprecation.

Look, I know that good illustrations can often be difficult to come up with. I struggle with them too. But let's be as careful with how we use them, neither putting too much or too little weight on them, lest we obscure the biblical purpose of preaching. The hearts of people are not won to Christ by our well-spun stories or images but the Spirit working through the very word of God. Our illustrations are meant to adorn the gospel, not help it. The gospel doesn't need any help.